Dwyer Cultural Center

258 St. Nicholas Avenue

(Between St. Nicholas and Frederick Douglass Boulevard)

New York, NY 10027

(212) 222-3060

Directions

Subway: A, C, D or B train to 125th Street

About this organization

Brooklyn Public Library

This library system--the fifth largest in the country--serves more than six million people each year. The famous Central Library, whose building resembles an open book, is the main reference center and the core of a borough-wide system with 58 branches in as many neighborhoods.

Hours

Sun01:30 pm - 03:30 pm

Words are Freedom

EXPIRED

Free admission (all visitors, all hours)


The Words are Freedom series take place every Sunday through February for Black History Month. Each program takes a look at notable American slaves and their stories.

February 3: The Confessions of Nat Turner
Join us for a book discussion of the definitive account of America’s most famous slave insurrection as dictated by Turner, a preacher and self-proclaimed prophet, from his jail cell. Hosted by Sterling L. Bland, Jr, Chair of African American and African Studies at Rutgers University and author of “Voices of the Fugitives: Runaway Slave Stories and Their Fictions of Self-Creation.”

February 10: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave
Douglass’s narrative is the most famous written account of an enslaved American and in it he describes his barbaric treatment, his struggle to become literate, and his eventual escape from slavery. Hosted by Sterling L. Bland, Jr, Chair of African American and African Studies at Rutgers University and author of “Voices of the Fugitives: Runaway Slave Stories and Their Fictions of Self-Creation.”

February 17: Nightjohn
This film follows Sarny, a 12-year-old slave girl, who faces a relatively hopeless life until a runaway slave named Nightjohn secretly begins to teach her to read and write, a crime punishable by death. Directed by noted independent filmmaker, Charles Burnett.

February 24: Harriet Jacobs’s Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl 
Written and published in 1861, on the eve of the Civil War, this autobiographical account by Jacobs, a former slave, details her master’s cruelty and physical abuse and recounts her harrowing experience as a fugitive attempting to secure her children’s freedom. Hosted by Sterling Bland, Jr, Chair of African American and African Studies at Rutgers University and author of “Voices of the Fugitives: Runaway Slave Stories and Their Fictions of Self-Creation.”





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