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Description

The Queens Botanical Garden, a living museum serving the most ethnically diverse county in the United States, is committed to presenting collections, education and research initiatives and programs that demonstrate environmental stewardship, promote sustainability and celebrate the rich cultural connections between people and plants. Green Trail markers highlight QBG’s sustainability practices and how visitors can “go green” at home.

QBG's 39 acres of gardens and sustainable landscape displays, such as the Cherry Circle, the Wedding Garden and the Oak Allée, are the reason many people visit.

Located at the northeast corner of Flushing Meadows Corona Park, this community cultural resource evolved from the five-acre Gardens on Parade exhibit showcased at the 1939-1940 New York World's Fair.

QBG has significantly renovated and updated many beloved features of the garden to ensure that this living museum continues to appeal to visitors for years to come.  The popular Herb Garden was expanded by nearly 50 percent and the Fragrance Walk now includes new examples of colorful, aromatic plant species.  A sustainably-managed Rose Garden was completed in 2009 along with new Annual Beds.  Current projects include a Floral Border, Ornamental Grass Garden and renovations to the Backyard Gardens.

The Parking Garden that opened in April 2010 is composed of a variety of paving materials to allow infiltration of water and parking bays interrupted by planted bioswales. This unique space manages stormwater on site and contributes to QBG's mission of environmental stewardship.

The 16,000 square-foot Visitor & Administration Building features three working roofs: one with photovoltaic panels to capture and use the sun's energy, another to capture rain for water uses and a green, planted roof accessible to the public. The building has achieved the highest (platinum) Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED(r)) rating from the U.S. Green Building Council. The LEED(r) rating system is a nationally recognized standard for sustainability that guides every aspect of planning, design, construction and operations.

Programs for Seniors
Tours of the grounds are available for groups.
A quarter-acre garden provides seniors with individual areas to grow their own vegetables and flowers, April-October. Members take home all the produce they grow for their own consumption.

Foreign-language Programs
The garden has signage and Green Trail Guides in Chinese, Korean and Spanish. Programs can be arranged.

Families

QBG’s Education Department provides environmental education workshops to over 16,000 elementary and middle school students through more than 420 class visits to the Garden each year.  Urban Advantage is a groundbreaking citywide science education initiative between middle schools, QBG, and seven other renowned science-rich cultural institutions in New York City.  Modified education programs for students with special needs from District 75 provides opportunities for students with cognitive impairments to explore the garden relying on their olfactory and visual senses.

The HSBC Children’s Garden provides hands-on learning and gardening experiences for young gardeners who explore the concepts of ecological balance, sustainability and conservation through gardening, recycling, nature study and crafts.  QBG offers more than 50 educational programs for children, youth, and families each year, attracting thousands of participants of all ages.  The Compost Project, supported, in part, by the New York City Department of Sanitation, educates families about the benefits of composting and vermicomposting (composting with worms) in an urban environment.

The Ambassador Program strengthens our connections with underserved communities in Queens by recruiting volunteers from diverse ethnic communities to attend meetings on behalf of the Garden and introduce the public to QBG; and the Greeter Program helps QBG to enhance its capacity by training interns and volunteers to welcome visitors to the Garden and lead tours of our new facility and grounds, deepening each visitor’s experience and sense of connection to the Garden.

School/Groups

QBG’s Education Department provides environmental education workshops to over 16,000 elementary and middle school students each year.  Urban Advantage is a groundbreaking citywide science education initiative between middle schools, QBG, and seven other renowned science-rich cultural institutions in New York City.  Modified education programs for students with special needs from District 75 provides opportunities for students with cognitive impairments to explore the garden relying on their olfactory and visual senses.

The HSBC Children’s Garden provides hands-on learning and gardening experiences for young gardeners who explore the concepts of ecological balance, sustainability and conservation through gardening, recycling, nature study and crafts.  QBG offers more than 50 educational programs for children, youth, and families each year, attracting thousands of participants of all ages.  The Compost Project, supported, in part, by the New York City Department of Sanitation, educates families about the benefits of composting and vermicomposting (composting with worms) in an urban environment.

The Ambassador Program strengthens our connections with underserved communities in Queens by recruiting volunteers from diverse ethnic communities to attend meetings on behalf of the Garden and introduce the public to QBG; and the Greeter Program helps QBG to enhance its capacity by training interns and volunteers to welcome visitors to the Garden and lead tours of our new facility and grounds, deepening each visitor’s experience and sense of connection to the Garden.