Brooklyn Museum Photo by Adam Husted

Description

Beginning September 3, 2014
Ages 19 and under: FREE
General Admission: $16
Seniors and Students: $10

One of the nation's premier art institutions, the Brooklyn Museum has one of the most active exhibition programs in town. Its exhibits range from the solidly classical (based on its strong collection) to the provocative art of our times. The museum's neo-classical structure was designed by McKim, Mead & White in 1893. Its 1.5 million artworks include several world-class collections. The Egyptian art collection is arguably the best in North America. Displayed on the third floor of the renovated Schapiro Wing, more than 500 objects represent Egyptian culture from the reigns of Akhenaten to Cleopatra VII. There's also a fine collection from Greek and Roman antiquity, as well as Assyrian and Coptic objects.

In 1923 the museum became the first such institution to exhibit African objects as art rather than artifacts. Since then the collection of central African pieces has grown to become among the most important in the country. Ancient American artistic traditions are represented by Andean textiles, including the famous Paracas Textile (c. 150 B.C.), Central American gold, Mexican sculpture and a fine collection of ceramics, totem poles, statuary, headdresses and masks. The Arts of the Pacific collection covers Polynesia, Melanesia and Indonesia. The arts of China, Japan, Korea, Southeast Asia and the Islamic world, from antiquity to the present, are represented in ceramics, sculptures and paintings.

Holdings in prints, drawings and photographs include major groups of works by Sargent, Homer and Eakins. There are notable drawings by Dürer, Rembrandt and Toulouse-Lautrec; prints by Bonnard, Redon and Vuillard; and many German Expressionist images. Photographic masters such as Hine, Atget and Steichen are also well represented. The Dinner Party, an important icon of 1970s feminist art and a milestone in 20th-century art, is presented as the centerpiece around which the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art is organized and is on permanent display. The Dinner Party comprises a massive ceremonial banquet, arranged on a triangular table with a total of 39 place settings, each commemorating an important woman from history.

In April of 2004 the museum unveiled a new façade, embarked on a new mission of inclusiveness and announced it would no longer be the Brooklyn Museum of Art, but would return to its longtime name prior to 1997, the Brooklyn Museum, all in an effort to reach the broadest spectrum of visitors and increase attendance.
First Saturdays, when the museum is free from 5-11 pm and presents a wealth of special events, is an enormous success.

Foreign-language Programs
With far advance notice, private guided tours in French, Russian and Spanish can be booked.

 

Families

Arty Facts: For those inclined to drop in on a Saturday or Sunday at 11 am or 2 pm, these workshops explore a range of themes and styles from the permanent collection, and are followed by an art-making project in the museum studio.

Gallery/Studio Program: Young people interested in focused art experiences can register for a semester of age-appropriate intensive study that highlights specific topics or techniques. Recent offerings have included Introduction to Abstract Painting, Animals in Art, The Museum As Inspiration for Comic Book Art, and Drawing the Human Figure.

Gallery/Studio Program: Young people interested in focused art experiences can register for a semester of age-appropriate intensive study that highlights specific topics or techniques. Recent offerings have included Introduction to Abstract Painting, Animals in Art, The Museum As Inspiration for Comic Book Art, and Drawing the Human Figure.

Storytelling in the galleries takes place every Saturday at 4 pm. Other family activities include special performances and concerts. Attendance is free with museum admission.

Family Admission: Varies according to program; some are free with museum admission

School/Groups

Offered in the museum's galleries, museum educator-led classes (1 hour for K to 1st grade and 1 1/2 hours for 2nd through 12th grade) are designed to allow students to interpret art and its cultural context through strategies such as discussion, writing, drawing, and small-group work. Many lessons meet New York State Learning Standards in art, social studies, and English language arts. Lessons may be adapted to meet individual curriculum needs. Teachers may also take classes on a self-guided tour of the museum; reservations required.

Programs for Teachers: Programs for school teachers of all subject areas and grade levels introduce teachers to the museum's permanent collection and special exhibitions, offer techniques for integrating the study of art into the classroom, and help teachers find connections among collections.

School Season: Oct-June
School Admission: New York City school groups: $50 guided, $35 self-guided, $1.50 per student guided special needs; $1 per student self-guided special needs; non-New York City school groups: $70 guided; $55 self-guided, $2.50 per student special needs; $2 per student self-guided special needs.