A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Al Hirschfeld Theater

This Broadway theater was completed in 1924 and owned and managed by vaudeville promoter Martin Beck until his death in 1940. In 2003, it was renamed to honor Al Hirschfeld (1903-2003), the caricaturist-cartoonist who chronicled live theater for 75 years.

Ambassador Theatre

The Ambassador is home to the musical Chicago. It was built in 1921 and seats 1,088.

American Theatre Wing

Dedicated to education and excellence in theater, ATW focuses on programs and activities which help students, audiences and members of the theatrical community learn what makes theater tick.

August Wilson Theater

Following the death of playwright August Wilson in 2005, the Virginia Theatre was renamed in his honor and is the first Broadway theater to be named after an African-American. IIt is one of several Broadway theaters owned by Jujamcyn Theaters.

Belasco Theatre

The Belasco's inaugural production was A Grand Army Man (1907), with a cast that included Antoinette Perry, the namesake of the Tony Awards.

Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre

The Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre (formerly the Royale) was originally built in 1927 by real-estate magnates, the Chanin Brothers, as part of a complex that also included the Majestic (a large musical house) and the Theatre Masque, now the John Golden (a small house). The three theaters enabled producers to move shows based on their ticket sales to the most appropriately-sized venue.

Booth Theatre

The musical Next to Normal is playing at the Booth Theatre. The 766-seat house is named for the actor Edwin Booth (1833-1893), brother to the infamous John Wilkes Booth, who assassinated Abraham Lincoln.

Broadhurst Theatre

George H. Broadhurst, the manager and playwright (1866-1952), built his eponymous theater in association with the Shubert brothers in 1917. It mirrors the Plymouth Theatre; both it and the Broadhurst were built by architect Herbert J. Krapp.

Broadway Theatre

The Broadway Theatre is one of only five playhouses that front the thoroughfare Broadway. It opened in 1924 as B. S. Moss's Colony, a premiere film house. The most notable film that played there in the early years was Walt Disney's Steamboat Willie, which opened in 1928 and introduced audiences to Mickey Mouse.