A 30-foot-tall neon Buckyball in the sky, a familiar statue from a whole new vantage, mischievous bronze figures on the 14th Street A, C, E subway platform—public art works are a reason to visit New York for some, and welcomed flourishes to an everyday route for others. To either audience, public art encourages new ideas, conversation and change the way a city is perceived.

Below are installations—both temporary and permanent—that will take your walk in a different direction.

    African Burial Ground Memorial

    African Burial Ground National Monument

    Manhattan

    Ongoing

    The memorial honors the estimated 15,000 enslaved and free Africans who were interred here during the 17th and 18th centuries. Visitors to the monument learn about the harsh living conditions under which African-Americans toiled, the customs they added to our culture and the many contributions they made to colonial America.

    Public Art in New York City

    Time spent outdoors with works of public art encourages new ideas, conversations and a welcomed flourish to an otherwise ordinary route. Take a detour on your next commute to visit one of these nearby pieces.

    Joie de Vivre

    Zuccotti Park

    Ongoing

    Sculptor Mark di Suvero's 70-foot-high Joie de Vivre (Joy of Life) resides in Lower Manhattan's Zuccotti Park.

    Red Cube

    Isamu Noguchi's sculpture was installed in Lower Manhattan in 1968. The diagonal lines of red painted steel stand in contrast to the stark horizontal and vertical lines of the adjacent Marine Midland Building.

    Public Art in New York City

    Time spent outdoors with works of public art encourages new ideas, conversations and a welcomed flourish to an otherwise ordinary route. Take a detour on your next commute to visit one of these nearby pieces.

Keith Haring: Crack is Wack

Harlem River Drive from East 131st Street to West 145th Street / West 155th Street to Dyckman Street

new york N.Y. 10032

at 128th Street and Second Avenue

African Burial Ground Memorial

Corner of Duane and Elk Streets

New York N.Y. 11211

2126372019

The memorial honors the estimated 15,000 enslaved and free Africans who were interred here during the 17th and 18th centuries. Visitors to the monument learn about the harsh living conditions under which African-Americans toiled, the customs they added to our culture and the many contributions they made to colonial America.

Joie de Vivre

Liberty Street

New York N.Y. 10045

Sculptor Mark di Suvero's 70-foot-high Joie de Vivre (Joy of Life) resides in Lower Manhattan's Zuccotti Park.

Spencer Finch, The River That Flows Both Ways

Between Gansevoort and West 20th Streets

New York N.Y. 10011

2125006035

The artist transforms a semi-enclosed loading dock's existing casement windows with 700 individually crafted panes of glass representing the water conditions on the Hudson River over a single day.