Free admission (all visitors, all hours)

Description

NYBG’s annual Black History Month celebration goes virtual this year with engaging digital programs you can enjoy at home. Throughout the month NYBG will showcase cultural traditions of the African diaspora and explore the influential contributions of Black people to botany, horticulture, ecology, and our collective understanding of the natural world. Discover captivating dance, creative and inspirational children’s programs, important historical narratives, and fascinating plant stories.

Welcome Message from New York State Senator Jamaal T. Bailey

Harambee Dance Company:
Let Us Pull Together

Image of african american man in bright red and gold sweater wearing a face mask holding one hand up while the other is on a large hand drum.

About Harambee Dance Company

NYBG and Harambee Dance Company celebrate Black History Month with a high-energy performance that reflects the majesty of the African diaspora through movement, modern dance forms, live percussion, and original music. In Swahili harambee means “let us pull together.” Artistic Director and resident choreographer Sandella Malloy pulls together the essence of African and African-American dance, presenting it from an innovative and contemporary perspective.

Programs for Kids and Families

Art Activity: Create Leaf Rubbings

Arvolyn Hill helps kids discover the beauty of nature in a single leaf and explore their creativity as they learn about the Pan-African flag.

WATCH THE VIDEO

Programs for Adults

NYBG Beyond Books Club: Black History Month

Join the NYBG Beyond Books Club on Facebook for a group discussion of published digital articles from prominent Black mycologists Dr. Thomas Gaither and Dr. Lafayette Frederick, as well as Plant Talk blog posts.

Join Beyond Books Club on Facebook

Upcoming and Recent Lectures

Photo of a woman walking in a field.

Carolyn Finney
Black Faces, White Spaces: Christian Cooper, John Muir & (Re)Claiming a Green World

In her recent NYBG lecture, storyteller, author, and cultural geographer Dr. Carolyn Finney explores the complexities and contradictions of our past, the realities of our present, and the possibilities of our future as it relates to green space, race, and our power to shape the places we live. Watch Video

Tidal pool in the memorial garden of the International African American Museum in Charleston, SC

Walter Hood
Landscape and Community: A Commemoration

In his recent NYBG lecture, landscape architect, author, and lecturer Walter Hood discusses how he designs urban spaces that resonate with and enrich the lives of current residents while also honoring communal histories. He is a professor of landscape architecture at UC Berkeley and the founder and creative director of Hood Design Studio. Watch Video