Frida Kahlo, Self-Portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird, 1940. Harry Ransom Center, The University of Texas at Austin. © 2014 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D.F. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Frida Kahlo, Self-Portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird, 1940. Harry Ransom Center, The University of Texas at Austin. © 2014 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D.F. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Free admission (all visitors, all hours)

This blockbuster exhibition will be the first to examine Frida Kahlo’s keen appreciation for the beauty and variety of the natural world, as evidenced by her home and garden as well as the complex use of plant imagery in her artwork. Featuring a rare display of more than a dozen original Kahlo paintings and works on paper, this limited six-month engagement will also reimagine the iconic artist’s famed garden and studio at the Casa Azul, her lifelong home in Mexico City.

Accompanying events invite visitors to learn about Kahlo’s life and enduring cultural influence through poetry, lectures, Frida al Fresco evenings, Mexican-inspired shopping and dining experiences, and hands-on art activities for kids.

Frida Kahlo Art

The LuEsther T. Mertz Library’s Art Gallery exhibition, curated by Adriana Zavala, Ph.D., will feature 14 of Kahlo’s paintings and works on paper—many borrowed from private collections— highlighting the artist’s use of botanical imagery in her work. Focusing on her lesser-known yet equally spectacular still-lifes, as well as works that engage nature in unusually symbolic ways, this grouping will include Self-Portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird (1940); Flower of Life (1944); Still Life with Parrot and Flag (1951); and Self-Portrait Inside a Sunflower (1954).

Frida Kahlo Garden

The Haupt Conservatory will come alive with the colors of Kahlo’s Mexico, greeting visitors with an evocation of the artist’s garden at the Casa Azul (Blue House), her lifelong home. Passing through blue courtyard walls, visitors will stroll along lava rock paths lined with flowers and showcasing a variety of important garden plants from Mexico. A scale version of the artist’s pyramid—created to display pre-Hispanic art collected by her husband, muralist Diego Rivera— will feature traditional terra-cotta pots containing desert plants found in her garden. The exhibition includes a reimagining of Kahlo’s studio overlooking the garden, as well as the organ pipe cactus fence located at Rivera’s studio in nearby San Ángel. Experience the Casa Azul as the ultimate expression of Kahlo’s connection to Mexico and the natural world.