Guided by Angelos Chaniotis, Professor of Ancient History and Classics, NYC-ARTS visits the exhibition “A World of Emotions: Ancient Greece, 700 BC-200 AD.” It is on view at the Onassis Cultural Center New York through June 24, 2017.

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THE EXHIBITION WORLD OF EMOTIONS IS CONCERNED WITH THE IMPORTANCE OF EMOTIONS IN A CULTURE THAT WE USUALLY ASSOCIATE WITH RISEN, WITH TECHNOLOGY, WITH ADVANCEMENT IN LITERATURE.

AND THIS IS THE GREEK CULTURE.

OF COURSE, ONE MAY SAY THAT EVERY CULTURE IS A WORLD OF EMOTION.

OUR FAMILY IS A WORLD OF EMOTION.

OUR WORKING PLACE IS A WORK OF EMOTION.

SO WHAT IS INTERESTING AND IMPORTANT ABOUT THE GREEK CULTURE THAT MADE US SHAPE WHOLE EXHIBITION AROUND THE SUBJECT?

IT'S THE FACT THE GREEKS WERE NOT THE FIRST PEOPLE WHO FELT SOMETHING BUT THEY WERE THE FIRST WHO THEORIZED ABOUT EMOTIONS AND THE FIRST WHO WROTE EPICS AND LITERATURE, COMPOSED ART IN ORDER TO EXPRESS THOUGHTS ABOUT EMOTIONS.

THE VERY FIRST LITERARY TEXTS THAT COMES FROM GREECE, THE ILIAD IS NOT AN EPIC POEM ABOUT THE TROJAN WAR, IT'S ABOUT AN EMOTION, WHICH IS STATED IN THE FIRST LINE OF THE POEM, THE EMOTION OF ANGER.

HOW ANGER IS CAUSED.

HOW IT DEVELOPS.

WHAT ARE THE CONSEQUENCES OF UNCONTROLLED ANGER AND THE EPIC ENDS WHEN THE ANGER OF ACHILLES ENDS.

ACHILLES WAS NOT ONLY THE PROTAGONIST, HE IS A MAJOR FIGURE IN THE SO-CALLED EPIC CYCLE THAT IS IN POEMS THAT TREAT VARIOUS EPISODES OF THE TROJAN WAR.

ONE OF THE MOST DRAMATIC THAT INSPIRED A LOT OF POETRY LATER IS THE STORY OF HIS BATTLE AGAINST AN AMAZON PRINCESS WHO WAS AN ALLY OF THE TROJANS.

THE STORY GOES THAT IN THE MOMENT IN WHICH ACHILLES KILLED HER AND WAS HOLDING HER DIEING BODY, HE LIFTED HER HELMET AND BY SEEING HER FACE AND ADMIRING HER BEAUTY AND HER VALOR, HE FELL IN LOVE.

ONE OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL IMAGES IN SCULPTURE BUT ALSO IN THE EXHIBITS OF THIS EXHIBITION IS -- THE FRAGMENTS OF A GROUP OF HER DIEING AND BEING HELD BY ACHILLES.

IT'S A VERY INTERESTING COMPOSITION, BECAUSE WHEN YOU LOOK AT IT, ACTUALLY YOU CANNOT RECOGNIZE WHO IS ACHILLES AND WHO IS THE WOMAN.

THE EXPRESSION OF BOTH THE WOMAN DIEING AND ACHILLES, WHOSE LOVE IS DIEING TOGETHER WITH HER, HAVE EXACTLY THE SAME FACIAL EXPRESSION.

IT'S LONGING FOR SOMETHING THAT CANNOT BE ATTAINED.

LONGING FOR LIFE, LONGING FOR LOVE.

IT ALSO SHOWS THE IMPORTANCE THAT ARTISTIC MEDIA HAVE IN THE REPRESENTATION OF EMOTIONS.

FOR INSTANCE, IN THIS CASE, THE WAY THE EYES AND THE GAZE OF THE TWO PROTAGONISTS IS RENDERED BY THE ARTIST.

THEIR COMPOSITION, THE TURNING OF THE HEAD, THE WAY THE FINGERS OF ACHILLES ARE STILL VISIBLE BEHIND THE HEAD.

SO IT IS ONE OF THE AIMS OF THE EXHIBITION IS TO EXPLAIN WHY EMOTIONS MATTER, WHY EMOTIONS MATTER SO MUCH IN GREEK ART AND LITERATURE, BUT ALSO TO SHOW HOW AN ANCIENT ARTIST HAS VARIOUS MEDIA IN ORDER TO CONVEY EMOTIONS, NOT ONLY TO REPRESENT THE EMOTIONS THAT TWO FIGURES HAVE BUT THE EMOTIONS THAT WE AS SPECTATORS, EVEN 2,000 YEARS LATER, MAY HAVE WHEN WE VIEW AN ANCIENT OBJECT.

ONE OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL IMAGES IN THIS EXHIBITION THAT REALLY FILLS US WITH SORROW IS THE IMAGE OF A YOUNG WOMAN WHO IS REPRESENTED HERE STANDING AND ABOUT TO LEAVE FROM AN ELDERLY PERSON, PROBABLY HER FATHER.

WHAT IS INTERESTING IN THIS IMAGE, IT IS AS IF THE FATHER WANTS TO HELD HIS DAUGHTER BACK BY HOLDING NOT ONLY HER HAND BUT HER ARM.

THE DAUGHTER RESPONDS BY OFFERING CONSOLATION TO HER FATHER BY PLACING HER HAND UNDER HIS CHIN.

WHAT IS ALSO INTERESTING IN THIS IMAGE IS THE FACT THAT TWO PERSONS DO NOT LOOK AT EACH OTHER.

THE FATHER CAN STILL LOOK AT HIS DAUGHTER -- TOWARDS THE FACE OF THE DAUGHTER.

IF YOU LOOK FROM MY PERSPECTIVE, YOU SEE THE DAUGHTER CAN NO LONGER LOOK AT HER FATHER.

THIS IS A SUBTLE WAY THROUGH WHICH THE ARTIST, AN ANONYMOUS ARTIST, NOT A GREAT ARTIST, AN ARTIST WHO WORKED IN A SMALL ISLAND, WAS ABLE TO CONVEY THE GRIEF OF THE PREMATURE DEATH OF A WOMAN WHOSE NAME IS STILL KNOWN ALEXI BOLA.

THERE'S ANOTHER WAY TO DEAL WITH THE SORROW OF DEATH.

THIS IS TO DEAL WITH IT SOMETIMES WITH WIT.

ONE OF THE MOST INTERESTING ANCIENT INSCRIPTIONS SURVIING IS THE GRAVE INSCRIPTION FOR A PIG THAT WAS KILLED DURING A TRAFFIC ACCIDENT.

I THINK THIS IS THE EARLIEST TRAFFIC ACCIDENT IN HISTORY.

THE PIG TALKS TO US A THOUSAND YEARS LATER THROUGH THE STONE.

THE TEXT SAYS MY NAME IS PIG.

EVERYBODY LOVED ME.

HIS DESIRE WAS ALWAYS TO TRAVEL.

WHILE IT WAS TRAVELING TO THE CITY, IT WAS KILLED BY A WAGON.

YOU CAN SEE HERE THE PIG MARCHING IN FRONT OF THE WAGON AND THEN THE PIG UNDER THE WHEELS OF THE WAGON.

WE ASSUME THE PIG HAD ACROBATIC QUALITIES.

THIS SIMPLE PICTURE SHOWS THE LOVE OF THE PIG TO TRAVEL.

THE FACT THAT THE GRAVESTONE TRAVELED TO NEW YORK IS IN FULFILLMENT OF THE DESIRE OF THE PIG TO TRAVEL.

THE PIG COULD NOT MAKE IT TO NEW YORK, BUT ITS GRAVESTONE DID.

IT SHOWS THE LOVE OF THE OWNER OF THE PIG WHO INSTEAD OF MAKING CUTLETS OF THE PIG, DECIDED TO BURY AND IT AND ERECTED A MONUMENT.

THE OWNER OF THE PIG OFFERED CONSOLATION HIMSELF FOR THE TRAGIC DEATH OF HIS DEAR ANIMAL WITH WHICH HE MADE PROBABLY HIS LIVING.

HE MUST HAVE BEEN A WANDERING ENTERTAINER WHO TRAINED HIS PIG AS AN ACROBAT.

WE DO NOT STUDY ANCIENT GREEK ART TO UNDERSTAND EMOTIONS.

WE HAVE TO STUDY EMOTIONS TO FULLY UNDERSTAND ANCIENT GREEK ART AND CULTURE.

I INVITE YOU TO VISIT THE EXHIBITION AT THE ONASSIS CULTURAL CENTER IN NEW YORK.