In celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising, we take a look at “Art after Stonewall, 1969–1989,” a collaboration between the Grey Art Gallery at NYU and the Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art. The exhibition is on view through July 20.

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> IN THE EARLY MORNING OF JUNE 28th, 1969, POLICE RAIDED THE STONEWALL INN ON CHRISTOPHER STREET IN LOWER MANHATTAN.

THE ROUTINE RAID TARGETED THE MOST MARGINALIZED MEMBERS OF THE LGBTQ COMMUNITY.

TYRECE OF FACING HARASSMENT AND ARREST, THE BAR'S PATRONS FOUGHT BACK.

WHAT BEGAN AS A SMALL RESPONSE SPANNING SIX DAYS PROVIDING THE SPARK FOR THE MODERN GAY LIBERATION MOVEMENT.

TOMORROW MARKS THE 50th ANNIVERSARY OF THE STONEWALL UPRISING.

IN CELEBRATION LOCAL INSTITUTIONS ARE TAKING A CLOSER LOOK AT THE IMPACT OF THE LGBTQ COMMUNITY ON THE ART WORLD.

CURRENT ON VIEW IS ART AFTER STONEWALL, AN EXHIBITION AT BOTH THE LESLIE LOHMAN MUMZ OF GAY AND LESBIAN ARTS AND THE GREY ART GALLERY.

EXPLORING TWO DECADES AFTER STONEWALL THROUGH THE WORK OF ARTISTS AND ACTIVISTS.

GLK ARTS SPOKE WITH JONATHAN WINE RK WHO COCURATED THE EXHIBITION.

♪♪ THE EXHIBITION ART AFTER STONEWALL IS OPENING IN NEW YORK FOR THE 50th ANNIVERSARY OF THE STONEWALL RIOT.

THE SHOW IS BETWEEN 1969 AND '89, THE FIRST 0 YEARS AFTER STONEWALL AND BEGINS AT LESLIE LOHMAN THE FIRST DECADE.

AND THEN THE SECOND DECADE IS AT THE GREY ART GALLERY.

BUT THERE IS SOME OVERLAPS AND CERTAIN THEMES REEMERGE.

THERE WERE MANY RIOTS PRIOR TO STONEWALL.

BUT ONE OF THE THINGS THAT WAS EXTRAORDINARY ABOUT THE STONEWALL RIOTS WAS THE DECISION BY CERTAIN RADICAL PEOPLE TO FOCUS ON STONEWALL AND TO CELEBRATE IT, ITS ANNIVERSARY A YEAR LATER.

SO THE SHOW REALLY BEGINS WITH THE NOTION OF COMING OUT, IF THERE WAS GOING TO BE LIBERATION PEOPLE HAD TO EXPRESS THEIR IDENTITIES.

ONE OF THE THINGS THAT CHANGES IN '69 AND THEN TO THE '70s AND THE '80s ARE WORKS OF ART BY ARTISTS SHOWING US THINGS, NOT REPRESSING OR HIDING THINGS.

IT'S VERY EXCITING TO HAVE IN THE SHOW THE WORK OF TOMMY SCHMIDT WHO WAS IN THE BAR WHEN THE STONEWALL RIOT OCCURRED AND PARTICIPATED.

HIS ALLEGORY OF THE STONEWALL RIOT IS REFERENCING THE STATUE OF LIBERTY AND THE IDEA OF THE FREEDOM THAT THAT MOVEMENT WAS A PART OF OR THAT ACT OF SAYING, LOOK, WE ARE TIRED AND WE'RE OUTRAGED THAT WE'RE NOT ALLOWED TO FOR EXAMPLE DANCE WITH EACH OTHER WITHOUT THE POLICE COMING IN AND RAIDING THE BAR.

SO IT TURNS SORT OF THE GARBAGE OF EVERYDAY LIFE AND MAKES IT WONDROUS.

IN A CERTAIN WAY I THINK THAT'S SORT OF THE STORY OF STONEWALL, WHICH IS HOW A BUNCH OF YOUNG PEOPLE WHO MAYBE WEREN'T VALUED IN THE SOCIETY SUDDENLY SAID, LOOK, WE DO MATTER.

WE GET TO LOVE WHO WE WANT TO LOVE.

AT BOTH SHOWS WE HAVE SOME TERRIFIC PICTURES OF MARSHAL P.

JOHNSON WHO ALSO WAS AT STONEWALL AND ALSO IS THIS INCREDIBLE FIGURE IN NEW YORK YEAR LIFE.

SHE WAS AN INCREDIBLE PERFORMER.

AND SHE SPOKE UP FOR THE RIGHTS OF TRANSGENDER PEOPLE.

ALONG WITH SILVIA RIVERA CREATED A ORGANIZATION TO STAND UP FOR TRANSGENDER PEOPLE WHO WERE SEX WORKERS.

AND WE HAVE A GREAT PHOTOGRAPH OF SILVIA RIVERA AT LESLIE LOHMAN AT THE EXACT MOMENT WHEN SHE WAS TURNING TO HER FELLOW MARCHERS AND SAYING TO THEM, LOOK, YOU'RE NOT TAKING THE SIDE OF TRANSGENDER PEOPLE.

AND THIS IS A REALLY IMPORTANT IDEA -- IT'S SOMETIMES HARD TO GET ACROSS THE NOTION THAT AT CERTAIN POINTS NOT EVERYBODY IN THE SHOW GOT ALONG.

ISSUES OF INCLUSIVITY AND DIVERSITY WERE SOMETHING THAT WAS A STRUGGLE THROUGHOUT THE 20 YEARS.

THINGS ARE QUEER IS THE THEME THAT INTRODUCING THE GREY GALLERY'S PART OF THE EXHIBITION.

BACK IN THE '70s, THE WORD QUEER WAS A DEROGATORY TERM FOR HOMOSEXUALS.

IN THE EARLIA 80s IT'S EMBRACING MANY IDENTITIES.

WAYNE MICHAELS THINGS ARE QUEER PERFECTLY ENCAPSULATES THE IDEA OF QUEERNESS AND THE IDEA THAT THE WORLD DOESN'T HAVE NORMAL PLACES, THAT EVERYTHING IF IT'S SEEN IN THE RIGHT CONTEXT CAN BE STRANGE.

SO THINGS ARE QUEER BECOMES REALLY ABOUT THE WORLD, A WORLD IS QUEER.

GREER LANGTEN WAS AN AMAZING ARTIST.

GREER'S MAJOR WORK IS THE FANTASTIC SCULPTURES, THE DOLLS SHE REALLY THOUGHT OF AS PEOPLE.

SHE WOULD TALK ABOUT THEM, DRESS THEM.

HER APARTMENT WOULD HAVE THE VARIOUS FIGURES DISPLAYED.

ALSO ANOTHER THEME IN HER WORK IS HER TRANSITION.

SHE WAS TRANSGENDER.

AND SHE WENT THROUGH QUITE A KIND OF TRAUMATIC SERIES OF EXPERIENCES.

AND THAT WAS SOMETHING THAT SHE DEALT WITH IN A LOT OF HER PAINTED WORK.

ONE OF THE ASPECTS OF THIS SHOW THAT CAN'T BE IGNORED IS THAT SO MANY OF THE ARTISTS ARE NO LONGER LIVING.

MANY OF THEM DIED OF HIV AIDS.

THE OTHER ASPECT OF IT IN THE '80s WAS THE RESPONSE OF ACT UP AND OTHER GROUPS TO FIGHT BACK, TO FIND A SOLUTION TO DEMAND GOVERNMENT ACTION.

THE FIRST POSTER IN THE SHOW IS SILENCE EQUALS DEATH, CREATED BY A COLLECTIVE.

THEY USED THIS TRIANGLE WHICH WAS THE NAZI SYMBOL FOR HOMOSEXUALITY.

THE OTHER PART OF THE STATEMENT, OF COURSE IS THAT TO REMAIN SILENT IN A CASE OF A TERRIBLE EPIDEMIC IS IMPOSSIBLE.

LEN ANOTHER CHIN'S DEJA VU DEALS WITH THE A.I.D.S. EPIDEMIC IN A DRAMATIC WAY.

IT'S BASED ON A PHOTOGRAPH OF LEN EOR TAKEN IN THE APARTMENT OF A CLOSE FRIEND WHO DIED OF A.I.D.S.

THE PERSON TAKING THE PHOTOGRAPH WAS HIS BROTHER.

THERE IS A CLOSE PERSONAL CONNECTION AND A WONDERFUL WAY IN WHICH IT SPEAKS OF A COMMUNITY STRUGGLING WITH DEATH BUT ALSO KIND OF AFFIRMATION OF AUTOMATICNY AND SELF-HOOD.

WE DIDN'T WANT TO END THE SHOW ON A.I.D.S.

WE WANTED TO END ON AFFIRMATION AND REPEAT THE THEME OF VISIBILITY.

THERE WAS A GREAT GROUP CALLED QUEER NATION AND ANY STAGED KISS INS AND PROTESTS THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES.

ONE OF THE PHRASES THEY WOULD SAY IS WE'RE HERE, WE'RE HERE WE'RE QUEER, GET USED TO IT.

WE DECIDED TO USE THAT PHRASE TO REALLY SPEAK OF THAT SENSE OF PRESENCE.

WHICH WE WANTED THE SHOW TO END ON.